Zoobiquity What Animals Can Teach Us About Health And The Science Of Healing Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Zoobiquity

Zoobiquity

Author: Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, Kathryn Bowers
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307958388
Pages: 320
Year: 2012-06-12
In the spring of 2005, cardiologist Barbara Natterson-Horowitz was called to consult on an unusual patient: an Emperor tamarin at the Los Angeles Zoo. While examining the tiny monkey’s sick heart, she learned that wild animals can die of a form of cardiac arrest brought on by extreme emotional stress. It was a syndrome identical to a human condition but one that veterinarians called by a different name—and treated in innovative ways. This remarkable medical parallel launched Natterson-Horowitz on a journey of discovery that reshaped her entire approach to medicine. She began to search for other connections between the human and animal worlds: Do animals get breast cancer, anxiety-induced fainting spells, sexually transmitted diseases? Do they suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder, bulimia, addiction? The answers were astonishing. Dinosaurs suffered from brain cancer. Koalas catch chlamydia. Reindeer seek narcotic escape in hallucinogenic mushrooms. Stallions self-mutilate. Gorillas experience clinical depression. Joining forces with science journalist Kathryn Bowers, Natterson-Horowitz employs fascinating case studies and meticulous scholarship to present a revelatory understanding of what animals can teach us about the human body and mind. “Zoobiquity” is the term the authors have coined to refer to a new, species-spanning approach to health. Delving into evolution, anthropology, sociology, biology, veterinary science, and zoology, they break down the walls between disciplines, redefining the boundaries of medicine. Zoobiquity explores how animal and human commonality can be used to diagnose, treat, and heal patients of all species. Both authoritative and accessible, offering cutting-edge research through captivating narratives, this provocative book encourages us to see our essential connection to all living beings.
Zoobiquity

Zoobiquity

Author: Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, Kathryn Bowers
Publisher: Vintage Books
ISBN: 0307477436
Pages: 398
Year: 2013
Draws on a wide range of disciplines to explore the parallels between humans and animals and what nature can teach about the human mind and body, sharing case studies about animal and human commonalities to explain new developments in health care.
Games Primates Play

Games Primates Play

Author: Dario Maestripieri
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 046502078X
Pages: 320
Year: 2012-04-10
A primatologist examines unspoken social customs, from jilting a lover to being competitive on the job, to explain how behavioral complexities are linked to humans' primate heritage.
Heal

Heal

Author: Arlene Weintraub
Publisher: ECW/ORIM
ISBN: 1770908005
Pages: 240
Year: 2015-10-01
How man’s best friend could help cure man’s greatest scourge: “An Emperor of All Maladies for dog lovers” (Dr. Sarah Boston, author of Lucky Dog: How Being a Veterinarian Saved My Life). Drawn from extensive research, on-the-ground reporting, and personal experience, this book explores the fascinating role dogs (and cats) are playing in the search for cures for cancer. Learn how veterinarians and oncologists are working together to discover new treatments—cutting-edge therapies designed to help both animals and people suffering from cancer. Heal introduces readers to the field of comparative oncology by describing several research projects aimed at finding new therapies for cancers that are similar in dogs and people, including lymphoma, osteosarcoma, breast cancer, melanoma, and gastric cancer. The author, who lost her sister to gastric cancer, also writes about the emerging science behind the remarkable ability of dogs to sniff out early stage cancer and the efforts underway to translate that talent into diagnostic devices for early detection of the disease. In the course of bringing these dogs and their human companions to life, Arlene Weintraub takes her own personal journey from grief to healing, as she shows how man’s best friend might be the key to unlocking the mysteries of cancer. “Readers will share Weintraub’s growing appreciation for the canine and feline subjects (and their owners) who are helping to advance cancer research.” —Publishers Weekly
Yoga as Medicine

Yoga as Medicine

Author: Timothy McCall
Publisher: Bantam
ISBN: 0553384066
Pages: 568
Year: 2007
Examines the history of yoga, describes its many health benefits, details various ailments that yoga can help prevent or treat, and explains basic yoga techniques, including postures, breathing, meditation, and safety.
Animal Madness

Animal Madness

Author: Laurel Braitman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1451627025
Pages: 384
Year: 2014-06-10
**“Science Friday” Summer Reading Pick** **Discover magazine Top 5 Summer Reads** **People magazine Best Summer Reads** “A lovely, big-hearted book…brimming with compassion and the tales of the many, many humans who devote their days to making animals well” (The New York Times). Have you ever wondered if your dog might be a bit depressed? How about heartbroken or homesick? Animal Madness takes these questions seriously, exploring the topic of mental health and recovery in the animal kingdom and turning up lessons that Publishers Weekly calls “Illuminating…Braitman’s delightful balance of humor and poignancy brings each case of life….[Animal Madness’s] continuous dose of hope should prove medicinal for humans and animals alike.” Susan Orlean calls Animal Madness “a marvelous, smart, eloquent book—as much about human emotion as it is about animals and their inner lives.” It is “a gem…that can teach us much about the wildness of our own minds” (Psychology Today).
GPS Declassified

GPS Declassified

Author: Richard D. Easton
Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.
ISBN: 1612344089
Pages: 301
Year: 2013-10-01
GPS Declassified examines the development of GPS from its secret, Cold War military roots to its emergence as a worldwide consumer industry. Drawing on previously unexplored documents, the authors examine how military rivalries influenced the creation of GPS and shaped public perceptions about its origin. Since the United States’ first program to launch a satellite in the late 1950s, the nation has pursued dual paths into space—one military and secret, the other scientific and public. Among the many commercial spinoffs this approach has produced, GPS arguably boasts the greatest impact on our daily lives. Told by the son of a navy insider—whose work helped lay the foundations for the system—and a science and technology journalist, the story chronicles the research and technological advances required for the development of GPS. The authors peek behind the scenes at pivotal events in GPS history. They note how the technology moved from the laboratory to the battlefield to the dashboard and the smartphone, and they raise the specter of how this technology and its surrounding industry affect public policy. Insights into how the system works and how it fits into a long history of advances in navigation tie into discussions of the myriad applications for GPS.
Why We Get Sick

Why We Get Sick

Author: Randolph M. Nesse, George C. Williams
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307816001
Pages: 304
Year: 2012-02-08
The next time you get sick, consider this before picking up the aspirin: your body may be doing exactly what it's supposed to. In this ground-breaking book, two pioneers of the science of Darwinian medicine argue that illness as well as the factors that predispose us toward it are subject to the same laws of natural selection that otherwise make our bodies such miracles of design. Among the concerns they raise: When may a fever be beneficial? Why do pregnant women get morning sickness? How do certain viruses "manipulate" their hosts into infecting others? What evolutionary factors may be responsible for depression and panic disorder? Deftly summarizing research on disorders ranging from allergies to Alzheimer's, and form cancer to Huntington's chorea, Why We Get Sick, answers these questions and more. The result is a book that will revolutionize our attitudes toward illness and will intrigue and instruct lay person and medical practitioners alike. From the Trade Paperback edition.
The Story of the Human Body

The Story of the Human Body

Author: Daniel Lieberman
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 030774180X
Pages: 460
Year: 2014
In this book the author, a Harvard evolutionary biologist presents an account of how the human body has evolved over millions of years, examining how an increasing disparity between the needs of Stone Age bodies and the realities of the modern world are fueling a paradox of greater longevity and chronic disease. It illuminates the major transformations that contributed key adaptations to the body: the rise of bipedalism; the shift to a non-fruit-based diet; the advent of hunting and gathering, leading to our superlative endurance athleticism; the development of a very large brain; and the incipience of cultural proficiencies. The author also elucidates how cultural evolution differs from biological evolution, and how our bodies were further transformed during the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. While these ongoing changes have brought about many benefits, they have also created conditions to which our bodies are not entirely adapted, the author argues, resulting in the growing incidence of obesity and new but avoidable diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. The author proposes that many of these chronic illnesses persist and in some cases are intensifying because of 'dysevolution,' a pernicious dynamic whereby only the symptoms rather than the causes of these maladies are treated. And finally, he advocates the use of evolutionary information to help nudge, push, and sometimes even compel us to create a more salubrious environment. -- From publisher's web site.
Successful Tails

Successful Tails

Author: Patricia H. Wheeler, PhD.
Publisher: AuthorHouse
ISBN: 1477264752
Pages: 374
Year: 2012-10-08
Successful Tails is a heartwarming collection of stories and photos of therapy dogs at work. The testimonials and stories run the gamut of emotions. Some will make you laugh or smile, while other will bring tears to your eyes. This book isn't just for people who want to become therapy dog handlers or staff at sites and programs that would like to have therapy dogs for those they serve, though both of these groups will find it useful. This book is for everyone.
Gifts of the Crow

Gifts of the Crow

Author: John Marzluff, Tony Angell
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439198748
Pages: 320
Year: 2013-02-05
A University of Washington professor of wildlife science taps the findings of his extraordinary research into crow intelligence to offer insight into their ability to make tools and respond to environmental challenges, explaining how they engage in human-like behaviors from giving gifts and seeking revenge to playing and experiencing dreams.
Why Dogs Hump and Bees Get Depressed

Why Dogs Hump and Bees Get Depressed

Author: Marc Bekoff
Publisher: New World Library
ISBN: 1608682196
Pages: 400
Year: 2013-11-01
In 2009, Marc Bekoff was asked to write on animal emotions for Psychology Today. Some 500 popular, jargon-free essays later, the field of anthrozoology — the study of human-animal relationships — has grown exponentially, as have scientific data showing how smart and emotional nonhuman animals are. Here Bekoff offers selected essays that showcase the fascinating cognitive abilities of other animals as well as their empathy, compassion, grief, humor, joy, and love. Humpback whales protect gray whales from orca attacks, combat dogs and other animals suffer from PTSD, and chickens, rats, and mice display empathy. This collection is both an updated sequel to Bekoff’s popular book The Emotional Lives of Animals and a call to begin the important work of “rewilding” ourselves and changing the way we treat other animals.
What a Plant Knows

What a Plant Knows

Author: Daniel Chamovitz
Publisher: Scientific American / Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1429946237
Pages: 192
Year: 2012-05-22
How does a Venus flytrap know when to snap shut? Can it actually feel an insect's tiny, spindly legs? And how do cherry blossoms know when to bloom? Can they actually remember the weather? For centuries we have collectively marveled at plant diversity and form—from Charles Darwin's early fascination with stems to Seymour Krelborn's distorted doting in Little Shop of Horrors. But now, in What a Plant Knows, the renowned biologist Daniel Chamovitz presents an intriguing and scrupulous look at how plants themselves experience the world—from the colors they see to the schedules they keep. Highlighting the latest research in genetics and more, he takes us into the inner lives of plants and draws parallels with the human senses to reveal that we have much more in common with sunflowers and oak trees than we may realize. Chamovitz shows how plants know up from down, how they know when a neighbor has been infested by a group of hungry beetles, and whether they appreciate the Led Zeppelin you've been playing for them or if they're more partial to the melodic riffs of Bach. Covering touch, sound, smell, sight, and even memory, Chamovitz encourages us all to consider whether plants might even be aware of their surroundings. A rare inside look at what life is really like for the grass we walk on, the flowers we sniff, and the trees we climb, What a Plant Knows offers us a greater understanding of science and our place in nature.
The Lost Art of Healing

The Lost Art of Healing

Author: Bernard Lown
Publisher:
ISBN: 0345425979
Pages: 344
Year: 1999
The author draws on his forty years of experience as a physician to call for a new appreciation of the importance of the doctor-patient relationship and of the art rather than the technology of medicine
Caesar's Last Breath

Caesar's Last Breath

Author: Sam Kean
Publisher: Little, Brown
ISBN: 0316381632
Pages: 384
Year: 2017-07-18
The Guardian's Best Science Book of 2017 One of Science News's Favorite Science Books of 2017 The fascinating science and history of the air we breathe It's invisible. It's ever-present. Without it, you would die in minutes. And it has an epic story to tell. In Caesar's Last Breath, New York Times bestselling author Sam Kean takes us on a journey through the periodic table, around the globe, and across time to tell the story of the air we breathe, which, it turns out, is also the story of earth and our existence on it. With every breath, you literally inhale the history of the world. On the ides of March, 44 BC, Julius Caesar died of stab wounds on the Senate floor, but the story of his last breath is still unfolding; in fact, you're probably inhaling some of it now. Of the sextillions of molecules entering or leaving your lungs at this moment, some might well bear traces of Cleopatra's perfumes, German mustard gas, particles exhaled by dinosaurs or emitted by atomic bombs, even remnants of stardust from the universe's creation. Tracing the origins and ingredients of our atmosphere, Kean reveals how the alchemy of air reshaped our continents, steered human progress, powered revolutions, and continues to influence everything we do. Along the way, we'll swim with radioactive pigs, witness the most important chemical reactions humans have discovered, and join the crowd at the Moulin Rouge for some of the crudest performance art of all time. Lively, witty, and filled with the astounding science of ordinary life, Caesar's Last Breath illuminates the science stories swirling around us every second.