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Governing Immigration Through Crime

Governing Immigration Through Crime

Author: Julie A. Dowling, Jonathan Xavier Inda
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804785414
Pages: 320
Year: 2013-03-27
In the United States, immigration is generally seen as a law and order issue. Amidst increasing anti-immigrant sentiment, unauthorized migrants have been cast as lawbreakers. Governing Immigration Through Crime offers a comprehensive and accessible introduction to the use of crime and punishment to manage undocumented immigrants. Presenting key readings and cutting-edge scholarship, this volume examines a range of contemporary criminalizing practices: restrictive immigration laws, enhanced border policing, workplace audits, detention and deportation, and increased policing of immigration at the state and local level. Of equal importance, the readings highlight how migrants have managed to actively resist these punitive practices. In bringing together critical theorists of immigration to understand how the current political landscape propagates the view of the "illegal alien" as a threat to social order, this text encourages students and general readers alike to think seriously about the place of undocumented immigrants in American society.
Governing Immigration Through Crime

Governing Immigration Through Crime

Author: Julie Dowling, Jonathan Inda
Publisher: Stanford Social Sciences
ISBN: 0804778809
Pages: 384
Year: 2013-03-27
In the United States, immigration is generally seen as a law and order issue. Amidst increasing anti-immigrant sentiment, unauthorized migrants have been cast as lawbreakers. Governing Immigration Through Crime offers a comprehensive and accessible introduction to the use of crime and punishment to manage undocumented immigrants. Presenting key readings and cutting-edge scholarship, this volume examines a range of contemporary criminalizing practices: restrictive immigration laws, enhanced border policing, workplace audits, detention and deportation, and increased policing of immigration at the state and local level. Of equal importance, the readings highlight how migrants have managed to actively resist these punitive practices. In bringing together critical theorists of immigration to understand how the current political landscape propagates the view of the "illegal alien" as a threat to social order, this text encourages students and general readers alike to think seriously about the place of undocumented immigrants in American society.
Punishing Immigrants

Punishing Immigrants

Author: Charis E. Kubrin, Marjorie S. Zatz, Ramiro Martinez
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 081474902X
Pages: 263
Year: 2012-10-15
Arizona’s controversial new immigration bill is just the latest of many steps in the new criminalization of immigrants. While many cite the presumed criminality of illegal aliens as an excuse for ever-harsher immigration policies, it has in fact been well-established that immigrants commit less crime, and in particular less violent crime, than the native-born and that their presence in communities is not associated with higher crime rates. Punishing Immigrants moves beyond debunking the presumed crime and immigration linkage, broadening the focus to encompass issues relevant to law and society, immigration and refugee policy, and victimization, as well as crime. The original essays in this volume uncover and identify the unanticipated and hidden consequences of immigration policies and practices here and abroad at a time when immigration to the U.S. is near an all-time high. Ultimately, Punishing Immigrants illuminates the nuanced and layered realities of immigrants’ lives, describing the varying complexities surrounding immigration, crime, law, and victimization. Podcast: Susan Bibler Coutin, on the process and effects of deportation —Listen here.
Targeting Immigrants

Targeting Immigrants

Author: Jonathan Xavier Inda
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1405150130
Pages: 224
Year: 2008-04-15
This book is concerned with the government of “illegal” immigration since the passage of the U.S. Immigration Act of 1965, exploring how certain mentalities and intellectual machineries have rendered illegal immigrants as targets of government. Examines how various authorities have created knowledge about and constructed “illegal” immigration as an ethical problem. Analyzes the tactics that have been deployed to govern immigration, particularly at the US-Mexico border. Using an ethnographic approach, draws on primary source materials – including government publications, archival documents, newspapers, and popular magazines. Studies measures (e.g. Operation Gatekeeper and Operation Hold-the-Line) for reforming the conduct of “illegal” immigrants in order to forestall illicit border crossings. Frames the study of immigration within Foucauldian theories of governmentality. Highlights the role of numbers and statistics in constructing the “illegal” immigrant.
Migra!

Migra!

Author: Kelly Lytle Hernandez
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520257693
Pages: 311
Year: 2010
Reveals the untold history of the United States Border Patrol from its beginnings in 1924 as a small peripheral outfit to its emergence as a large professional police force. This book focuses on the daily challenges of policing the borderlands and bringsto light unexpected partners and forgotten dynamics.--[source unknown].
Civil Rights in Public Service

Civil Rights in Public Service

Author: Phillip J. Cooper
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317516370
Pages: 628
Year: 2016-09-19
Promises of justice and equality made in the U.S. Constitution, numerous Amendments, and decisions of the Supreme Court are hallmarks of American civil rights. Yet the realities of inequality remain facts of modern life for too many Native Americans, African Americans, and Latino Americans, even though state-mandated racial segregation has been outlawed for years. Women still face a variety of forms of discrimination—some subtle and others more overt. There remain many laws that treat people differently because of sexual orientation. People with disabilities are supposed to be protected by a variety of statutes, but many of these policies remain unfulfilled promises. These are just some of the many challenges of civil rights that persist in a nation that proudly points to the words above the entrance to the U.S. Supreme Court that read "Equal Justice Under Law." This text is for current and future public service professionals —whether they are in government agencies, in nonprofit organizations that provide social services for government, or contractors who operate as state actors—who increasingly serve diverse communities with a range of complex challenges, while working and managing within organizations that, fortunately, are themselves more diverse than ever before. For those who work and serve in such settings, civil rights is not an abstract academic study, but a critically important and very practical fact of daily life. This book may also be used on civil rights law, policy, and public administration courses, and each chapter ends with a section on ‘Issues for Policy and Practice’ to guide an examination of key public policy hurdles in the fight for civil rights as well as the implications for public service practice. Through an engaging exploration of edited court cases, legislation, and speeches, the reader is encouraged to think critically about civil rights law and policy pertaining to African Americans, Native Americans, Latinos/Latinas, gender, sexual orientation, and disabilities, to learn what civil rights require, but also to come to a more empathetic understanding of how different groups of people experience civil rights and the unique challenges they face.
Immigration and the Law

Immigration and the Law

Author: Sofía Espinoza Álvarez, Martin Guevara Urbina
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816537623
Pages: 392
Year: 2018-04-10
A critical look at the mechanisms, beliefs, and ideologies that govern U.S. immigration laws, and the social impacts of their enforcement--Provided by publisher.
Do the Crime, Do the Time: Juvenile Criminals and Adult Justice in the American Court System

Do the Crime, Do the Time: Juvenile Criminals and Adult Justice in the American Court System

Author: G. Larry Mays, Rick Ruddell
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313392439
Pages: 242
Year: 2012-03-09
This book provides a fresh look at the way the United States is choosing to deal with some of the serious or persistent youth offenders: by transferring juvenile offenders to adult courts.
Model Immigrants and Undesirable Aliens

Model Immigrants and Undesirable Aliens

Author: Christina Gerken
Publisher:
ISBN: 0816674728
Pages: 328
Year: 2013
Christina Gerken examines the changing debates around immigration that surrounded the passage of landmark legislation by Congress in the mid-1990s, arguing that it represented a new, neoliberal way of thinking and talking about immigration. She concludes that the passage of pathbreaking legislation was characterized by a useful tension between neoliberal assumptions and hidden anxieties about race, class, gender, and sexuality.
Governing through Biometrics

Governing through Biometrics

Author: B. Ajana
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137290757
Pages: 238
Year: 2013-09-19
Managing identity through biometric technology has become a routine and ubiquitous practice in recent years. This book interrogates what is at stake in the merging of the body and technology for surveillance and securitization purposes drawing on a number of critical theories and philosophies.
Governing Through Crime

Governing Through Crime

Author: Jonathan Simon
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195181085
Pages: 330
Year: 2007-02-03
Across America today gated communities sprawl out from urban centers, employers enforce mandatory drug testing, and schools screen students with metal detectors. Social problems ranging from welfare dependency to educational inequality have been reconceptualized as crimes, with an attendant focus on assigning fault and imposing consequences. Even before the recent terrorist attacks, non-citizen residents had become subject to an increasingly harsh regime of detention and deportation, and prospective employees subjected to background checks. How and when did our everyday world become dominated by fear, every citizen treated as a potential criminal?In this startlingly original work, Jonathan Simon traces this pattern back to the collapse of the New Deal approach to governing during the 1960s when declining confidence in expert-guided government policies sent political leaders searching for new models of governance. The War on Crime offered a ready solution to their problem: politicians set agendas by drawing analogies to crime and redefined the ideal citizen as a crime victim, one whose vulnerabilities opened the door to overweening government intervention. By the 1980s, this transformation of the core powers of government had spilled over into the institutions that govern daily life. Soon our schools, our families, our workplaces, and our residential communities were being governed through crime.This powerful work concludes with a call for passive citizens to become engaged partners in the management of risk and the treatment of social ills. Only by coming together to produce security, can we free ourselves from a logic of domination by others, and from the fear that currently rules our everyday life.
Textbook on Immigration and Asylum Law

Textbook on Immigration and Asylum Law

Author: Gina Clayton
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198747551
Pages: 672
Year: 2016-07-21
The seventh edition of Textbook on Immigration and Asylum Law continues to provide students with expert coverage of case law and legislation, along with dynamic analysis of the political context and social impact of the law, and a strong focus on human rights. Including key case summaries, chapter questions and further reading, the book deftly guides the reader through this fascinating and constantly developing area of law, using clear and accessible language throughout. An ideal guide for all students of the subject. This book is accompanied by an Online Resource Centre, which contains the following resources designed to support the book: - Updates providing easy access to changes and developments in the law - Problem questions to test knowledge and develop analytical skill - Guidance on how to answer the end-of-chapter questions - A selection of web links to support additional research
Nordic Nationalism and Penal Order

Nordic Nationalism and Penal Order

Author: Vanessa Barker
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351980149
Pages: 168
Year: 2017-11-08
In late summer 2015, Sweden embarked on one of the largest self-described humanitarian efforts in its history, opening its borders to 163,000 asylum seekers fleeing the war in Syria. Six months later this massive effort was over. On January 4, 2016, Sweden closed its border with Denmark. This closure makes a startling reversal of Sweden’s open borders to refugees and contravenes free movement in the Schengen Area, a founding principle of the European Union. What happened? This book sets out to explain this reversal. In her new and compelling book, Vanessa Barker explores the Swedish case study to challenge several key paradigms for understanding penal order in the twenty-first century and makes an important contribution to our understanding of punishment and welfare states. She questions the dominance of neoliberalism and political economy as the main explanation for the penalization of others, migrants and foreign nationals, and develops an alternative theoretical framework based on the internal logic of the welfare state and democratic theory about citizenship, incorporation, and difference, paying particular attention to questions of belonging, worthiness, and ethnic and gender hierarchies. Her book develops the concept of penal nationalism as an important form of penal power in the twenty-first century, providing a bridge between border control and punishment studies.
Mass Incarceration on Trial

Mass Incarceration on Trial

Author: Jonathan Simon
Publisher: New Press, The
ISBN: 1595587926
Pages: 224
Year: 2014-08-05
For nearly forty years the United States has been gripped by policies that have placed more than 2.5 million Americans in jails and prisons designed to hold a fraction of that number of inmates. Our prisons are not only vast and overcrowded, they are degrading—relying on racist gangs, lockdowns, and Supermax-style segregation units to maintain a tenuous order. Mass Incarceration on Trial examines a series of landmark decisions about prison conditions—culminating in Brown v. Plata, decided in May 2011 by the U.S. Supreme Court—that has opened an unexpected escape route from this trap of “tough on crime” politics. This set of rulings points toward values that could restore legitimate order to American prisons and, ultimately, lead to the demise of mass incarceration. Simon argues that much like the school segregation cases of the last century, these new cases represent a major breakthrough in jurisprudence—moving us from a hollowed-out vision of civil rights to the threshold of human rights and giving court backing for the argument that, because the conditions it creates are fundamentally cruel and unusual, mass incarceration is inherently unconstitutional. Since the publication of Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow, states around the country have begun to question the fundamental fairness of our criminal justice system. This book offers a provocative and brilliant reading to the end of mass incarceration.
Nothing Personal?

Nothing Personal?

Author: Nick Gill
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444367056
Pages: 240
Year: 2016-02-23
In this groundbreaking new study, Nick Gill provides a conceptually innovative account of the ways in which indifference to the desperation and hardship faced by thousands of migrants fleeing persecution and exploitation comes about. Features original, unpublished empirical material from four Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) funded projects Challenges the consensus that border controls are necessary or desirable in contemporary society Demonstrates how immigration decision makers are immersed in a suffocating web of institutionalized processes that greatly hinder their objectivity and limit their access to alternative perspectives Theoretically informed throughout, drawing on the work of a range of social theorists, including Max Weber, Zygmunt Bauman, Emmanuel Levinas, and Georg Simmel